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  1. Not separating Business from Personal Accounts. You must have a separate financial identity for your business, even as a solopreneur or freelancer. Keep your money separate and write yourself a paycheck from the business. No living out of the till. Use a fee free checking account for all of your business income, and pay your expenses, including your paycheck, at regular intervals from that account.

 

  1. Immediately Making Large Purchases for the Business. Often these large purchases are made on credit, putting the business immediately into the negative with debt. Do you need that new computer right now? How about that website? All of those services? Keep the business lean by purchasing only the necessities. Know your B-Number to determine the amount of money you need to make based on prioritized expenses and put large purchases on hold until you have the cash.

 

  1. Having too Much Personal Debt. Personal income is often dipped into when businesses are first starting. Until the income really gets going, it’s not unusual to pay for certain expenses from personal funds. Having a large personal debt load means less money available for business expenses if needed for perhaps a marketing funnel or to pay a large expense that comes up. On the other hand, if you are relaying on your business to pay all of your bills, personal debt means more money needed from the business, and less money staying in the business for growth or new launches.

 

  1. Not Saving for Emergencies and “Down Times.” Business is cyclical. It just is. Income will be variable, particularly in new businesses who are starting to get visibility and a steady income stream. It is always a good idea to keep an emergency fund on hand- set aside into a free checking account for those months where you don’t make enough to pay those B-Number expenses. Some advice for starting and funding an emergency fund can be found here.

 

    1. Not Having a Clear Spending Plan for Your Business. Money can easily run off and spend itself when your business doesn’t have a spending plan. Always starting from the B-Number, where is any extra money going? You may get by for a bit, but having a plan ensures you can afford to take certain steps in your business. Taking 45 minutes a month to map out upcoming expenses or expansions and what you plan to spend where. If you need accountability or help with your plan, go ahead and check out our Business Money Planning Group.10